The Media Mirror - What's in today's Russian press?

Today's Russian newspapers spotlight the SALT-1 treaty, the 62nd anniversary of the U.S. nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and solutions for Russia's demographic problems.

IZVESTIA writes, if the U.S. walks out on the SALT-1 treaty in 2009 by refusing to sign its prolongation it would mean that America will be free to use its ballistic missile potential as it pleases, with or without nuclear warheads.

At the moment the nuclear balance looks as follows:

Russia has 542 ICB Missiles, the U.S. have 559 ICBMs.

Russia – 78 strategic bombers, the U.S. – 142 strategic bombers.

Russia has 12 ballistic missile carrying submarines (boomers), the U.S. have 14 boomers.

VREMYA NOVOSTEI commemorates the 62nd anniversary of the U.S. nuclear bombing of Hiroshima with a piece of Russia's own nuclear history: it appears that in June, 1949, several months before the Soviet Union tested its first nuclear device, Stalin ordered to a high-ranking Chinese delegation to be misinformed on the pace of the Soviet nuclear programme: a film showing a non-nuclear explosion was shown to the Chinese. Stalin had no intention of sharing nuclear capability with Mao, writes the paper, so he showed Lu Chiao Tsy a fake.

KRASNAYA ZVEZDA in its Friday issue had an interview with Admiral Henry Ulrich, commander of the U.S. Naval forces in Europe who had taken part in the celebration of the Day of the Russian Navy.

The Admiral paints a clear and positive picture of the relations between the two naval forces, American and Russian, in all areas of interaction, of which the biggest are the Atlantic and the Pacific oceans. The two navies have been exchanging ship visits, exercising together, learning to co-operate against a common imaginative enemy, training in counter-terrorism. He says:

“We are definitely partners, not rivals. I think we can establish an even better quality co-operation. We should use every opportunity to do just that.”

NOVAYA GAZETA has a page dedicated to the demographic problems of Russia – or rather, the proposed solutions. One comes from the Governor Morozov of Ulyanovsk who proclaimed September 12 a holiday and told all the employees of the regional government to go home see to the solution of the demographic problem personally. The day is to be spent under the slogan: Give Birth to a Patriot, when it would be more correct to word it in another way: Conceive a Patriot!

The youth pro-Putin movement “Nashi” (Ours, or our youth – close to the Unity Party) started a campaign of exchanging string panties for more substantial underwear. They insist that the strings cause infections that reduce the fertility of the nation's women. Who knows, it might be the solution?