The Media Mirror – a review of today's Russian newspapers

Thursday's Russian papers cover a wide range of stories, including the activities of the new Russian Prime Minister, the visit to the U.S. by Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, and the involvement of Russia and China in the unrest in Myanmar.

The new Russian Prime Minister Viktor Zubkov says there’s no need to change anything else in the Government, reports Vremya Novostey On his visit to the Penza region, Zubkov told the accompanying journalists: “the only possible changes in the Cabinet will be in the distribution of responsibilities among the deputy Prime Ministers”.

Kommersant writes that Viktor Zubkov visited a local market outside the city of Penza and found out that the price of meat had been lowered especially for his visit from 160 to 120 roubles per kg. The Prime Minister summoned the managing director of the company that runs the market. Zubkov firmly suggested that the director should write a report on the incident and deliver it to him through the regional Governor.

Vremya Novostey says the Ministry of Economic Development under the new leadership has found the courage to admit that inflation is a political matter. This year’s figure is going to be slightly higher than last year’s.

Izvestia editor Elena Ovcharenko writes from New York: the Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is stirring America like a visiting star or like a monster on a PR trip. His best performance was reserved for the UN where he announced: that Iran's nuclear “problem” has been solved.  Apparently it's now a routine matter for the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Another comment, from Vremya Novostey: Mahmoud Ahmadinejad came to New York wishing to surprise the world with his peaceful intentions. He chose as the key issue the notion of Iran being ready to co-operate with the International Atomic Energy Agency at all levels, says Dr. Nina Mamedova, a well-known Russian expert on Iran.

Nezavisimaya Gazeta reports on another hot issue under discussion at the UN: the unrest in Myanmar. The paper says the “red-robe monk revolution” is taking place against a background of major international energy deals involving China, Russia and India. The U.S. used to be a player too but found itself left out due to its own economic sanctions.

The paper says, Russia and China insist that the “revolution” is an internal problem of Myanmar, requiring no international involvement.

A Kommersant headline reads: Russia and China are silently watching the suppression of a Buddhist revolution. But the article inside says, Russia and China insist they keep urging the two sides of the conflict to reach a peaceful resolution.