Russian press review, 11.12.06

Russian press writes about the possible consequences of Litvinenko’s death, analyses the recent NATO and CIS summits, covers Pope Benedict’s visit to Turkey and takes a look at the Russian metallurgical industry.

“KOMERSANT'S VLAST” weekly magazine takes a look at the consequences of Litvinenko’s death. The weekly says Londoners may have had a different attitude towards his death if it wasn't for the fact he became a British citizen just a month before. It also says the future of the British Home Secretary will depends on the outcome of the investigation. However, Russia is likely to suffer the most, since the majority of Britons believe the Kremlin had a hand in his killing.

“PROFIL” weekly magazine analyses the recent NATO and CIS summits. The weekly quotes experts who believe the two organizations are outdated. NATO came to the fore in the mid 1990s when it was expanding to the East. However, the 9/11 terrorist attack changed its role and fighting global terrorism became its top priority. The magazine says there is a problem now because NATO member states are reluctant to send troops to the worlds hot spots. As for the CIS, the weekly says it has continually failed to agree on reforms and is facing a crisis.

“NEWSWEEK” magazine covers Pope Benedict’s visit to Turkey. The weekly believes the Pope went there, not to reconcile the West with the East, but to show that Muslim and Christian civilizations are in a kind of cold war. The Pope’s message was clear and could be expressed in one phrase: there should be no double standards. The magazine says, If Muslims want to be respected in the West, Christians must enjoy the same respect in the East. It goes on to say, the West should stop hiding its Christian Identity, fearing it may offend non-Christians.

“ITOGI” weekly magazine analyzes the Russian metallurgical industry. According to experts, it is a long way ahead of other players in the business community, in terms of international stock market listing. The reason, according to the weekly, is that Russian companies have long been export-oriented. They also very quickly settled ownership conflicts. Now they are free to access global markets. Besides, the weekly says, listing protects companies from possible take over.