Russia Today conquers New York

This year RT beamed live pictures of New Year celebrations in Russia to New Yorkers. The live broadcasts of the events in central Moscow and Saint Petersburg were shown on large screens in Times Square, where about a million people gathered. Meanwhile, th

New Yorkers were eight hours away from marking the New Year, but a celebration was already underway in Times Square.

Up above, for hundreds of thousands to see, was a live broadcast of Russia Today.

Our channel aired live on two JumboTron screens showing Russians in Moscow and St. Petersburg ringing in the New Year.

This unprecedented move ignited a wave of excitement among the New York crowd. 

New Yorkers were happy to join celebrations
New Yorkers were happy to join celebrations


This was the first time a live broadcast from Russia had aired in Times Square, joining two iconic cities on one celebratory night.

This event was of a month-long promotional campaign Russia Today unveiled in New York City, as our 24-hour international channel hit the airwaves.

Throughout the Big Apple, Russia Today double-decker buses could be seen hitting the roads.

And if that didn't grab enough attention, the dozens of Grandfather Frosts and stunning Snow Maidens aboard the buses surely did.

One hundred Russian holiday characters made stops all around Manhattan singing, dancing, and handing out Russia Today gifts for the holiday season.

News about Russia Today channel could even be seen on televisions inside yellow taxi cabs.

But the live broadcast in Times Square, by far, garnered the most attention.

THIS IS AMAZING. IT'S AMAZING TO SEE ALL OF THOSE TV'S SHOWING ANOTHER PART OF THE WORLD, WHERE THEY ARE ALREADY CELEBRATING THE NEW YEAR. IT'S AMAZING!

New York resident

Just one hour before New York welcomed 2008, Russia Today once again lit up the sky, this time sending a holiday greeting to the some one million people packed into Times Square.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of New Year's Eve celebrations in Times Square.
 
Over the decades, the crowd has grown bigger, noisier and more enthusiastic, and now, Russia Today has added a new element to the excitement.

From Red Square to Times Square – this year New Yorkers got to see the holiday from a Russian perspective.