Obama – the multi-million-dollar man

While the world suffers from the financial crisis, U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama has faced criticism for spending more than $US 3 million on a 30-minute campaign commercial, which was broadcast through the whole country.

On Wednesday, the ad ran at prime-time on several major television networks simultaneously and looked like a last-minute attempt to get the support of undecided voters.

In the commercial the Democratic candidate introduced voters to his views on such issues as healthcare, education, jobs and winding down the war in Iraq.

Obama introduces several American families from different parts of the country, who speak about “the challenges they face”. The stories are cut with Obama’s comments and recordings of his speeches where he tells how he’d cope with these problems.

As he referred to family values, the video showed Obama and his family. The candidate spoke about his mother:

“I know what it's like to see a loved one suffer, not just because they're sick, but because of a broken healthcare system. And it's wrong.”

The nominee’s special concluded with Obama speaking live from his Florida rally in front of a 20,000 crowd.

“America, the time for change is coming. To all of you and all of those who’ve joined us from across the country, in six days we can choose an economy that rewards work and creates jobs, and fuels prosperity starting with the middle class. In six days we can choose to invest in healthcare for our families and education for our kids and renewable energy for our future. In six days we can choose hope over fear and unity over division; the promise of change over the power of the status quo,” he said.

The commercial was directed by ‘An Inconvenient Truth’ Oscar winner Davis Guggenheim and cost about $US 4 million.

Obama’s ability to finance such a pricey commercial is based on the record-breaking amount of money that has poured into his campaign. In September alone he managed to raise $US 150 million.

His rival, Republican John McCain, referred to the event as a “gauzy, feel-good commercial paid for with broken promises.”

With the U.S. election only five days away, RT will be examining different aspects of the campaigns for the White House. Today it’s young voters.