Czech government approves U.S. anti-missile base

The Czech government has approved the building of a U.S. anti-missile radar base on its territory. Now the parliament has to give its backing to the system. Meanwhile, two activists are into their ninth day of hunger strike in protest.

Prague and Washington are expected to sign two agreements on hosting the radar in early June.

The U.S. also plans to install interceptor missiles in Poland where authorities have voiced strong support for the idea.

The proposed installation prompted strong opposition in both countries and across Europe. Moscow has denounced the plan as a threat to Russia's nuclear deterrent.

The United States maintains the missiles defence shield will protect Europe from so-called rogue states and is not meant against Russia.

Fears grow for Czech hunger strikers

Two Czech activists are into their ninth day of hunger strike in protest against the proposed U.S. anti-missile defence system in Eastern Europe. “No to Military Bases” movement promotes the idea of a referendum on the issue of the American radar station installing.

Both of the activities feel unwell, with one losing six kilos already.

The activists say their aim is not to die but to demonstrate that majority of citizens are against the plans for the missile shield in Czech Republic.

“We don’t believe that this is the right way to achieve security, we don’t believe that this is the right way for safer peaceful world. We believe that on the contrary this will lead to new armament, will increase international tensions and could possibly lead to a new open conflict,” Jan Tamash, the movement activist, said.