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28 Oct, 2023 20:32

Organizer of Ivy League ‘doxxing truck’ raided by SWAT – media

Adam Guillette’s Accuracy in Media sent mobile billboard ads to colleges to denounce pro-Palestinian students as antisemites
Organizer of Ivy League ‘doxxing truck’ raided by SWAT – media

Adam Guillette, whose Accuracy in Media organization deployed a “doxxing truck” to Ivy League colleges to denounce pro-Palestine students as antisemites in the aftermath of Hamas’ attack on Israel, told the New York Post that his North Florida home was raided by a SWAT team on Friday.  

The activist claimed the heavily armed police unit had searched his home around 1:30am in response to a call alleging he was holding his wife at gunpoint there, adding he was actually traveling at the time and had only learned of the visit thanks to a phone call from local authorities.  

Security camera footage supplied by Guillette appeared to show six officers entering his home using the digital security lock after no one responded to their knock and searching his belongings. He told the Post someone had lied to police “to get [him] killed” as retaliation for AIM’s doxxing truck, which first appeared at Harvard University days after the Hamas attack, pledging to “double down on our efforts” to expose pro-Palestinian students and faculty.  

Covered in digital LED screens, the original truck displayed the names and photos of Harvard students who had allegedly signed a letter stating that Israel was “entirely responsible” for Hamas’ surprise attack under the heading “Harvard’s Leading Antisemites” while circling the school’s Cambridge, Massachusetts campus. 

It subsequently parked outside the homes of the leaders of student groups that had co-signed the statement so that “everyone in their community should learn who the antisemites are among them,” Guillette explained. A website displayed on the truck encouraged viewers to email Harvard trustees demanding they “take action against these despicable, hateful students,” including immediate expulsion and banning their organizations from campus.   

Guillette bragged that AIM bought web domains for the student leaders’ names and “set up profile pages to educate the public on what they’ve done,” rigging these to appear prominently in Google search results. He justified the harassment by pointing out that the students’ home addresses “were very easily publicly available” and stressing they only targeted the leaders of organizations, not members. 

The apartheid regime is the only one to blame,” Harvard’s Palestine Solidarity Committee wrote in its statement, co-signed by 34 student groups, the day of Hamas’ attack. It did not contain any hateful statements about Jews or Israelis but merely urged the “Harvard community to take action to stop the ongoing annihilation of Palestinians.” However, Guillette argued that its failure to “explicitly condemn Hamas” constituted overt antisemitism. 

On Wednesday, AIM sent a similar truck to Columbia University in New York City, doxxing students allegedly involved in “a horribly hateful, antisemitic proclamation.” Another truck deployed to the Philadelphia campus of the University of Pennsylvania condemned its president, Elizabeth Magill, for allowing the school to host a Palestinian literary event in September.

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