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‘Minor’ critical problem? Boeing admits ANOTHER glitch in 737 MAX software

‘Minor’ critical problem? Boeing admits ANOTHER glitch in 737 MAX software
After a report on the fatal crash of Ethiopian Airlines blamed a 737 MAX software error, Boeing reportedly revealed a second glitch. The “relatively minor” but still critical problem will delay 737s returning to service.

In a report on last month’s crash that killed all 157 on board of the ill-fated airliner, Ethiopia blamed Boeing’s MCAS software that caused the jet to nosedive. On Thursday, Boeing confirmed to the Washington Post that it had found another software problem.

We are taking steps to thoroughly address this relatively minor issue and already have the solution in work to do that

Also on rt.com Boeing must review 737 MAX flight control system; pilots followed recommended procedures – Ethiopia

The problem affects flaps and other flight stabilization hardware, according to two unnamed Federal Aviation Administration officials cited by the Post. The FAA has classified it as critical to flight safety and ordered a fix. It will take weeks for the problem to be patched, meaning that the 737 Max fleet will remain grounded for the foreseeable future

Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 plunged into a field shortly after takeoff in early March. Indonesian Lion Air Flight 610 nosedived into the sea last October, killing all 189 passengers and crew. Investigators noted “clear similarities” between both accidents.

Also on rt.com ‘Sorry for lives lost’: Boeing admits faulty system part of ‘chain of events’ in 737 MAX crashes

On Thursday, Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg offered condolences for “lives lost” and said the company was “relentlessly focused on safety to ensure tragedies like this never happen again.”

The Ethiopian government report said the crew of Flight 302 “had performed all the procedures, repeatedly, provided by [Boeing], but was not able to control the aircraft.”

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