General Prosecutie for you: Crimea’s Poklonskaya promoted to new rank

Natalya Poklonskaya (RIA Novosti / Taras Litvinenko)
Natalia Poklonskaya, Crimea’s chief prosecutor, who came to prominence during the peninsula’s controversial partition from Ukraine, has been promoted. She is now a major general equivalent.

The promotion is one of 80 ordered this week by Russian President Vladimir Putin among officers of the military, the police, the prosecution, the investigative committee, customs and other law enforcement agencies.

Poklonskaya’s rank was raised form chief justice councilor to state justice councilor 3rd class, which corresponds to a promotion from colonel to major general in the Russian military or the police force.

Her previous promotion came in March 2014, days after being appointed acting chief prosecutor of Crimea by the prosecutor general. The appointment was made permanent two months later.

READ MORE: 'She annexes your heart': Reasons why Crimea prosecutor Poklonskaya not to be messed with

Poklonskaya, 35, rose to global prominence during the turbulent secession of Crimea from Ukraine and reunification with Russia. At a media conference she spoke up for rebellious local authorities, denounced the armed coup in Kiev and declared Crimea’s refusal to submit to the new Ukrainian authorities. Her harsh words and stern expression contrasted greatly with her cute blond appearance and unusual voice, sparking an instant internet meme.

She is among the public figures, who were personally slapped with travel and financial sanctions by the European Union for her role in the fateful events. In Ukraine she is wanted for conspiracy to overthrow lawful authorities.

Crimea rebelled against the coup-imposed authorities in Kiev, which took power after ousting President Viktor Yanukovich in February 2014. Local residents voted overwhelmingly for breaking away from Ukraine and requested Russia to take Crimea under its sovereignty, which was granted in March.

Kiev and its foreign backers consider the move illegal and imposed through force. However, Moscow insists it was a proper execution of Crimea’s right for self-determination, as stated in the UN Charter.