'V for Varoufakis!' Greek finance minister burns EU with laser eyes (VIDEO)

Still from Youtube video
As Greece’s finance minister clashes with the EU and his German counterpart over Athens' debt to the Troika of European lenders, a German show has uploaded a YouTube video spoof of the economic standoff between them, entitled ‘V for Varoufakis’.

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“He’s the lost son of Zeus with a heart made of stone!”"his body screams of sex”“his leather jacket is made of skin from German shepherd puppies”“He doesn’t negotiate, he simply kicks ass”. These are just some of the lyrics to the awfully catchy metal tune about Yanis Varoufakis that is taking YouTube by storm, with 6,300 views in just four hours.

The video, courtesy of Now Magazine Royale, proudly, and in an almost mock-Germanic tone, lists the Germany’s achievements – the positive (like the economy, the large gold reserves etc.) and the negative ones (like starting two world wars and "almost" winning).

All the while, tense and poignant music plays in the background, while a slender military-looking German with a mustache proudly recites the achievements.

This is all done to tongue-in-cheek montage of Oktoberfest girls carrying beer and other traditional symbolism, interlaced with Germans doing back-up singing to the music, “Varoufakis! Relentless Varoufakis!”, as the whole thing descends into a heavy metal song. It’s topped off with a devilish Varoufakis, grinning away, his bald head gleaming in the dark as he plays the bouzouki like an electric guitar.

“Dear Greek Folks, the time has come: we surrender! Take all our money, you may also take Helene Fischer, but please, keep this financial Hercules off us. We could only just bear with Costa Cordalis [a German singer of Greek origin], so this is clearly way too much!” the description to the video reads.

The current economic standoff reached a new high, as Varoufakis claimed his country’s acceptance of Brussel’s bailout strategy for Greece amounted to a “sell-off of family silver at rock-bottom prices and in a way that doesn’t lead to development for the economy.”