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Spending millions on propellers and solar panels won’t make sun brighter or wind stronger, Russian envoy tells EU on energy crisis

Spending millions on propellers and solar panels won’t make sun brighter or wind stronger, Russian envoy tells EU on energy crisis
Responsibility for the results of the European Union’s energy policies cannot be placed on Moscow, says Russia’s permanent representative to the bloc, Vladimir Chizhov.

“Russia is not responsible for Europe’s energy crisis, it lies on those people responsible for the energy policy,” Chizhov told RT on the sidelines of the 14th Eurasian Economic Forum in Verona, Italy.

According to the envoy, EU officials also blame the insufficient rates of introducing renewable energy for galloping gas prices.

“Like if you pump a few more million euros into those propellers and solar panels, the sun will shine brighter and the wind will blow in the right direction and with the right speed, but that is certainly not the case,” he said.

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Chizhov highlighted the need to have the reserve capacities for those countries that are opting to get rid of nuclear energy and coal as the central focus of their energy policy.

“For the foreseeable future and for the long-term perspective, for those unhappy days when the wind is not blowing, and there’s no sun, they will need natural gas,” he pointed out.

Chizhov’s comments come amid surging prices for gas, coal, oil and electricity not only in Europe, but around the world. The current energy crisis is commonly attributed to the post-pandemic rebound of the global economy, and the rising demand that the under-invested energy sector is not able to cope with.

For more stories on economy & finance visit RT's business section

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