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World’s first modular mini-reactor to be built in China

World’s first modular mini-reactor to be built in China
China has launched the construction of the world’s first multi-purpose small modular reactor in the country’s southernmost Hainan province. Work on Linglong One, also known as ACP100, began on Tuesday, Xinhua reports.

Linglong One is a pressurized water reactor with a capacity of 125 MW – the first small commercial onshore modular reactor or SMR to be constructed in the world. After being launched, the SMR will be able to generate enough power to meet the energy demands of approximately 526,000 households annually.

It has been developed by the China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC) and will be part of China’s Changjiang nuclear power plant. The project was first introduced back in 2010, with construction, which was originally scheduled for 2017, postponed due to regulatory setbacks.

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In 2016, Linglong One became the first SMR to pass a safety review by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

SMRs can be used for power generation and heating, as well as seawater desalination. Such reactors are infinitely less expensive than traditional nuclear installations, and their construction and deployment takes much less time. Logistics are also an advantage, with small sizes allowing modular reactors to be delivered and set up for operation in any remote area.

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