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Elizabeth Warren suggests crushing monopolies – RT's Keiser Reports weighs in

Elizabeth Warren suggests crushing monopolies – RT's Keiser Reports weighs in
Max and Stacy from RT’s Keiser Report delve into the anti-trust plans unveiled by Democratic presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren, which they say may finally bring real competition to the US’ monopolies-dominated economy.

Last week, the Massachusetts senator said she wants to break up and regulate companies that “bulldozed competition,” referring to Silicon Valley tech giants Facebook, Amazon, and Google. Warren said she would introduce legislation barring the platforms from offering a marketplace and selling their services on that same marketplace.

Bringing the idea to the presidential policy debate can mark a “whole new era” in American politics, according to host Max Keiser. However, Warren may fail to find enough supporters as her plan would also mean higher prices, the business commentator notes.

“If Elizabeth Warren were interested in re-architecting the economy so that it has a fair distribution of both risk and opportunity, she would say ‘let’s get rid of the current socialist system run by central banks that are manipulating the price of money, let’s bring in actual competition, free markets and we’ll have a much better economy,’” Keiser told his co-host.

Though it is still a big question whether the senator will become the nominee for the Democrats, her statement, which reignited talk of monopoly-busting, previously brought up by Bernie Sanders and President Donald Trump, goes beyond party lines and can be applied to healthcare or telecoms, Stacy Herbert noted.

For more stories on economy & finance visit RT's business section

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