Waiting for a silver lining

James Barth, Eminent Scholar in Finance and Lowder Eminent Scholar in Finance, Auburn University

1943 – Born in Detroit
1965 – Graduates, California State University, Sacramento
1967 – Receives MA, University of New Mexico
1972 – Receives PhD, ohio state university
1972 – Assistant professor of economics, George Washington University
1975 – Principal analyst, fiscal analysis division, U.S. Congressional budget office
1975 – Associate professor of economics, George Washington University
1980 – Associate director, economics programme, National Science Foundation
1981 – Visiting scholar, research department, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
1981 – Professor of economics, George Washington University
1983 – Visiting scholar, fiscal analysis division, U.S. congressional budget office
1984 – Visiting scholar, office of policy and economic research, Federal Home Loan Bank board
1987 – Chief economist and director, office of policy and economic research, Federal Home Loan Bank board
1989 – Lowder eminent scholar in finance, Auburn University
1989 – Chief economist, office of thrift supervision, U.S. Department of the Treasury
1996 – Visiting scholar, office of the controller of the currency, U.S. Department of the Treasury
1997 – Shaw foundation professor, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
1997 – Senior finance fellow, Milken Institute
1998 – Visiting scholar, World Bank
2002 – International team leader, Asian development bank project on reforming China’s banking laws and regulations
2009 – Advisory committee member, centre for financial innovation and financial stability, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Today we will talk about economics. The U.N. predicts that the volume of world trade will fall more than 11 percent in 2009, the largest decline since the Great Depression of the 1930s. If the problems the world economy is facing are similar to those of 1930s, could the solution be similar as well? We’ll be discussing this possibility with James Barth...