Sergey Guriev, the Rector of the New Economic School in Moscow

Sergey Guriev
Economist
Associate Professor of Corporate Finance, Human Capital Foundation, Moscow
Rector, New Economic School, Moscow
CEO, Centre for Economic and Financial Research, New Economic School

1971 - Born in Vladikavkaz
1993 - Receives M.Sc. in Technology, Moscow Institute of Physics
1994 - Receives Ph.D. in Applied Math, Russian Academy of Sciences
1999 - Research affiliate, Centre for Economic Policy Research, London
2002 - Receives Ph.D. in Economics, Russian Academy of Sciences
2003 - Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, Princeton University
2003 - Columnist, Vedomosti, leading Russian business daily
2004 - Associate Professor of Corporate Finance, Human Capital Foundation, Moscow
2004 - Rector, New Economic School, Moscow
2005 - CEO, Centre for Economic and Financial Research, New Economic School
2006 - Named as Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum
 
Sergey Guriev is a well known economist, in Moscow. After graduating from the Moscow Institute of Physics and later receiving a PhD in applied math, he decided that math and physics weren’t enough to give him a broad choice of career in the future. So, Dr Guriev went on to study for a second PhD, this time in economics. This certainly helped him earn his current posts of CEO of the Centre for Economic and Financial Research at the New Economic School, Rector of the New Economic School in Moscow and Associate Professor of Corporate Finance at the Human Capital Foundation. His research interests include contract theory, corporate governance and labour mobility. In 2006, he was selected as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum. Dr. Guriev has been published in international journals including the American Economic Review, Journal of European Economic Association and Journal of Economic Perspectives. Since 2003, he has also been a columnist for the leading Russian business daily, Vedomosti and has also contributed occasional columns to the New York Times, Moscow Times and Expert magazine.
 
Talks on establishing a gas cartel have recently intensified. Russia, Iran, Qatar, Venezuela, Algeria and Trinidad and Tobago are planning to co-ordinate their policies on the production and trade of gas. Meanwhile, Russia is to adopt a three-year budget, which clearly spells out a strategy to reduce our dependency on natural resources. How will the establishment of a gas cartel affect the global energy market and what's the forecast for the Russian economy three years down the road? Sergey Guriev, the Rector of the New Economic School in Moscow, is on Spotlight to tell us more.