Kennette Benedict, Executive director of Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

Kennette Benedict joined the Bulletin in October 2005 as executive director. Previously, she was director of the International Peace and Security Area at the John and Catherine MacArthur Foundation, where she also served as senior advisor to the president on philanthropy. She was responsible for grantmaking on issues of international peace and security, including support for efforts to reduce the threat from weapons of mass destruction and a $50 million initiative on science, technology, and security. While serving as director of the International Peace and Security Area, she established and directed the Foundation’s initiative in the former Soviet Union and in 2000 established a program of support for higher education in Nigeria. Her past research and teaching focused on organisational decision making, jury decision making, and on women’s leadership and American politics. She has published articles on global governance and on violent conflict. Prior to her academic career, she served in the Massachusetts State Planning agency on law enforcement and criminal justice.
 
Sixty years ago, in 1947 scientists of the Manhattan project in the United States created a so called doomsday watch, that showed the time left to the hour X, when the nuclear threat is irreversible. This year the International Atomic Energy Agency is marking its 50th anniversary. How did it contribute to preventing nuclear proliferation? And how fast is the timer running today? Kennette Benedict, Executive director of Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, is on Spotlight to tell us more