Is denial a crime?

Natalya Narochnitskaya is a historian and head of the Paris office of the Russian Institute of Democracy and Co-operation

1948 - Born in Moscow
1970 - Graduates, Moscow State Institute of International Relations
1982 - Works at UN Secretariat, New York
1990 - Activist, Party of People’s Freedom
1994 - Co-Founder, All-Russian National Rights Centre
1995 - Co-Chairwoman, All-Russian National Rights Centre
2003 - Member, Motherland Bloc, State Duma
2004 - Vice Chairwoman, State Duma International Affairs Committee
2008 - Head, Russian Institute of Democracy and Co-operation, Paris Office

Today we will talk about history. According to Sergey Shoigu, Russia's Emergencies Minister, Russia needs a law making it a criminal offence to deny the role of the Soviet Union in the defeat of Nazi Germany during World War II. Speaking to war veterans on Red Army Day earlier this month, Shoigu said the law would “protect the history and the heroic deeds of our fathers and grandfathers.” But does history need protection? We’ll be talking about it with Natalya Narochnitskaya, a historian and head of the Paris office of the Russian Institute of Democracy and Co-operation.