Russian Foreign Ministry reports on Moscow, Washington’s nuclear arsenals

Moscow is concerned over the potential threat to its nuclear capabilities from any US-European missile defense system that is developed without Russia’s participation (Photo from http://traditio.ru/)
Moscow has 521 intercontinental ballistic missiles and missiles deployed on submarines and heavy bombers, while the US has 882, according to the newly published data.

­The Russian Foreign Ministry has published data on the strategic nuclear arsenals of the two countries under the new START treaty. Moscow and Washington have 1,537 and 1,800 nuclear warheads respectively. As for deployed and non-deployed ICBM launchers, Russia has at present 865 compared to the US’ 1,124.

Moscow and Washington exchanged the data concerning their nuclear capabilities on February 5, and the information was specified to March 22. The US State Department first published data on the US strategic potential on June 1. The data shows that the US has more intercontinental ballistic missiles, warheads and launchers than Russia.

The two sides signed the new strategic arms reduction treaty (START) on April 8 in Prague. The agreement limits the number of warheads on deployed ballistic missiles and long-range bombers for both sides to 1,550. Deployed and non-deployed strategic launchers are limited to 800.

Earlier this month, Russia’s envoy to NATO Dmitry Rogozin said that Moscow “will not tolerate any doubts” concerning its strategic nuclear capabilities. Russia will find different ways to reduce any missile threat to nothing, he said.

Moscow is also concerned over the potential threat to its nuclear capabilities from any US-European missile defense system that is developed without Russia’s participation.

Meanwhile, on Monday Russia’s Defense Ministry introduced the first fully-manned regiment to be equipped with up-to-date Yars (RS-24) ground-based mobile missiles, Interfax reports. Colonel Vadim Koval, the spokesman for the Strategic Missile Forces, said that RS-24s will “increase the combat capacity and nuclear deterrence potential” of these forces.