‘National security threat:’ Meet the neocons’ worst nightmare

Catherine Shakdam
Catherine Shakdam is a political analyst, writer and commentator for the Middle East with a special focus on radical movements and Yemen. A regular pundit on RT and other networks her work has appeared in major publications: MintPress, the Foreign Policy Journal, Mehr News and many others.Director of Programs at the Shafaqna Institute for Middle Eastern Studies, Catherine is also the co-founder of Veritas Consulting. She is the author of Arabia’s Rising - Under The Banner Of The First Imam
The new leader of Britain's opposition Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn. © Peter Nicholls
Western democracy has a new champion and his name is Jeremy Corbyn. Following decades of complete political lunacy, war mongering and hawkish paranoia, reason has re-entered the fray, finally putting to shame those officials whose only narrative has been one of exclusion and latent xenophobia in defense of sociopathic imperial capitalism.

Arab Spring move over and let's make some room for one very British social democratic awakening! Let's face it; Britain needed a break from "business as usual", especially since "business" has essentially entailed the disappearing of the middle class to the tune of Orwellian policies. With corporations leading the political dance, the people never really stood a chance - increasingly elitist policies stand testimony to Britain's very undemocratic devolution into a capitalist police state.
But this was then, and this is today.

Jeremy Corbyn now sits as the head of Labour. Needless to say that his election has scared the living daylights out of the establishment. Can you imagine a man of the people elected to represent the people?! That is one incredible concept to wrap one's head around for the likes of Tony Blair and David Cameron.

READ MORE: Corbyn versus Sanders: 'Two different political animals’

When it comes to democracy, Britain's political class would have you believe that in between theory and practice lays an eternal "national security" threat, one which requires extraordinary autocratic measures. In other words, the UK and most of the well thinking Western world has lived under the assumption that in order to safeguard its much prized democratic freedom it had to abandon all rights and liberties.

This narrative has of course extended to foreign policy and how Western capitals have related to the rest of the world - mainly the Middle East and of course the new "enemy" of choice: the great Russian bear.

But have no fear Mr. Corbyn is here! And with him, revolutionary concepts such as social justice, equity, solidarity and yes, socialism, have come to explode the establishment's gold plated barricades.

Could it be that Britain took a page out of Russell Brand's book "Revolution" and embraced the idea that change is not only possible but very much inevitable when fueled by popular will? In any case, Britain's political landscape has been changed and we can all breathe a little easier for it.

READ MORE: Anti-war Jeremy Corbyn attacked for defending white peace poppy

But if many have been wise enough to recognize in Mr. Corbyn's victory Britain's very own silver lining - the return of the people into the ominous world of realpolitik - neocons are not exactly jubilant. Let's just say they would much rather crush democratic socialism in its infancy than see it flourish into a potent source for global change. Socialism is dead they're chanting; socialism is anti-democratic and borderline dangerous they’re all professing.

Is it though? What are those policies the Establishment is so fiercely opposing; so much so that Prime Minister Cameron went as far as labeling Corbyn a "national security threat"?

Allow me to borrow the words of one prominent intellectual, Vijay Prashad, Director of International Studies at Trinity College. He wrote: "Corbyn’s script is written in large part by the social democratic tradition—government intervention to deliver public services, an end to muscular military intervention, and higher taxes on the wealthy."

Dangerous policies indeed from the perspective of blood-thirsty capitalists with pockets made heavy by war lobbyists. If holding true to the rule of law, promoting peace and political self-determination have become synonymous to dissidence what does it say about Western democracies? More importantly how far down the elitist road has Britain fallen for its politicians to equate democratic socialism with devil worshiping? Or is it those days that politicians are more concerned with pleasing corporations than they are serving the people they are meant to represent?

Mr. Corbyn has rattled capitalism's cage so badly that the establishment has resorted to slander and unsophisticated propaganda techniques to stir Britain back into its political slumber.

© Peter Nicholls

Here is the thing, Mr. Cameron, juxtaposing images of Corbyn and ISIS militants will not help forward your narrative - not when your office has argued arming radicals to save Syria's institutions … we all know where this narrative led us: nowhere, very fast and very dangerously.

Here is a novel idea: since Western policies have only served to exacerbate social inequalities, unemployment levels, poverty and social tensions, while engineering an exodus of biblical proportion through the promotion of wars in the Middle East, what about giving humanity a chance to find itself again through the implementation of a different set of values?

Another question to ponder over: why is it that Western capitals could wholeheartedly support 2011 Arab revolutionary movements and yet slammed its principles when professed in their streets?

READ MORE: 'Security threat’: Tories deepen anti-Corbyn offensive on defense policy (VIDEO)

While the slander train will most likely gain momentum under the denigrating smirks of Britain's political aristocracy, let us remember that while a man of his own ideas, Mr. Corbyn has also become another piece to a global phenomenon - democratic socialism. And from the looks of it, it's catching on fast: Thomas Mulcair in Canada, Bernie Sanders in the United States … news voices are emerging, made strong by the people backing them.

To the grand dismay of the establishment I'm sure, the people have put the P back into politics. Get use to it because the people are still the ruling majority.


The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of RT.