‘Result of Maidan – revival of Nazism in Ukraine’

Reuters/Valentyn Ogirenko
So-called ‘European values’ in action can be witnessed as Kiev forges its new ‘artificial’ identity, and leans on Nazi collaboration 70 years after end of the WWII, political analyst Alexander Pavic told RT. It is a scandal in Europe, he added.

Ukraine has adopted a controversial law recognizing the so-called ‘Ukrainian Insurgent Army’. It was a military wing of an ultra-right organization called the Ukrainian Nationalist Organization and fought a guerilla offensive against the Soviets in the Second World War.

RT:Ukraine's Parliament tried to legally recognize the Insurgent Army last year but failed. Why is this a pressing issue for Kiev?

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Alexander Pavic: First of all, I think we need to concentrate on the fact that these are the so-called world famous “European values” in action. A year and a half ago you may have had a corrupt Ukraine; you did not have a neo-Nazi Ukraine. What is happening now is that this new government, this new regime in Ukraine is trying to forge an artificial new identity. Unfortunately, the only identity on which to have to lean on in the near history is that of Nazi collaboration. This is the result of the Maidan after a year and a half. We’re having the 70th year anniversary of the victory in WWII and we’re seeing a full revival of Nazism and fascism in Ukraine.

RT:The organization is banned in Russia so Moscow's reaction is predictable. But how will this be received in other countries?

AP: We shall see... So far the Western countries which have been very, very lenient as far as what has been going on in Ukraine - have actually supported Maidan and everything that happened afterwards. They have been supportive of pretty much everything that has been going in Ukraine. So it will be really very interesting to see now that practically Nazis and Nazi collaboration in Ukraine is being legalized right now. It’ll be interesting to see what the Western democracies have to say about it because they are the biggest supporters of the Ukraine government right now.

Reuters/Valentyn Ogirenko

RT:It’ll be clear in people’s minds that the "Ukrainian Insurgent Army" killed thousands of Poles. So how do you think Warsaw will react to this?

AP: This is a paradox because Poland has been one of the main supporters of the new Ukraine, of the post-Maidan Ukraine. I think from the start they were surely aware of the fact of the presence of far-right extremist and neo-Nazi groups which are part of this new Ukraine. I think for the Polish government right now this is a real embarrassment, and it will be very interesting to see their reaction to this.

RT:Ukraine has also adopted a law banning the promotion of Nazism. But the Ukrainian Insurgent Army is known for its collaboration with the Nazis. How can it be recognized on the same day that such a law was adopted?

AP: This is a PR game. This is just something for external use. They are granting benefits to people who are Nazi collaborators. And this is real. The fact that they are trying to distance themselves from Nazism, this is just verbal. But the real action, something that is tangible is that they are actually equating Ukraine and Ukrainian national identity with Neo-Nazism - that is a scandal in Europe, 70 years after the end of WWII.

The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of RT.