Israel will mobilize all ‘friends and assets’ to try and derail Iran nuclear deal

Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.(Reuters / Lucas Jackson)
Although Israel will mobilize all resources to try and derail Iran’s nuclear deal, Washington’s allies in the Middle East will eventually have to adjust to a new reality, Daoud Khairallah, Professor of International Law at Georgetown University, told RT.

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RT:It is a positive step, but the US and France, they are already insisting that sanctions will return if Iran does not comply. Does that suggest that perhaps trust is still an issue here?

Daoud Khairallah: I trust Iran will comply, and there is no reason to doubt this. President Obama said in fact said that this deal is in security interests of the US primarily and the rest of the world. I trust that as a result of this deal, if it reaches logical conclusion, it will lead to major change of state of mind and the way relations are taking place between Iran and the rest of the world. And it will have a very positive impact primarily in fighting terrorism, fighting Al-Qaeda and its derivative ISIS, Al-Nusra and so on.

I trust that this will create an environment for finding rational, peaceful solutions to problems in the area, notwithstanding the fact that there are some hotheaded reckless leaders, such as Mr. Netanyahu, who would be opposing this deal in every way they can.

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RT:June 30 is the deadline that the P5+1 and Iran have set to sign this deal and set it in stone. Are you hopeful that that target will be met?

DK: I am, and the reason for that is that aside from the US all other five member countries, the EU, and Russia, and China are in favor of this deal.

I doubt very much that the US would want to be alone opposing a deal that the whole world wants.

RT:And what about the role that Israel could play here?

DK: I think Israel – especially with this prime minister, Mr. Netanyahu – will try everything they can. Inside the US, inside Congress, they will mobilize everything they can because they had bet a lot on this. They had made an environment of tension in the Middle East based on vilifying Iran and creating an Iranian “scarecrow” and “nuclear threat to the whole world.” Whereas Israel sits on a huge pile of nuclear weapons. The oddity of the Israeli position is just untenable. But I don’t think that they will be successful. And other allies of the US, and people or countries that were scared of Iran in my judgment, especially in the Arab world, will adjust to this reality and will find ways to solve their problems.

RT:There is a prospect now of these nuclear related sanction being lifted on Tehran, which would allow Iran to be able to enter the global nuclear fuel market. Is that a big victory for Iran, is that an important part of the deal here?

DK: I don’t think it’s a big victory. Iran wanted to maintain a certain level of autonomy as independent nation. I don’t think that Iran had in mind to build a nuclear weapon arsenal. Iran wanted to maintain a certain autonomy of using and developing its nuclear knowhow in a peaceful way. And I think it has reached what it wanted, a certain level of moral autonomy in deciding its own future without violating any international law, or offending any code of conduct among nations.

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RT:Only the nuclear related sanctions against Iran that are going to be lifted at the moment. How long do you expect the other sanctions to remain in place?

DK: When you create an environment of rational peaceful negotiations, try to solve mutual problems in a peaceful way, it will open new avenues and it will make some American companies who would see interest in Iran to put pressure in smoothing the way to normalize the environment.

Notwithstanding the fact that we should not undermine what Israel and its friends and assets here, when mobilized, can do. But it will be perceived, with time, that this is a wrong way to go.

RT:So you see today’s developments more of a positive step forward toward normalizing relations rather than a deal out of necessity?

DK: Definitely. It is out of necessity, it’s true, of course, but at the same time it normalizes the relationship. It is bound to create a different environment, a normal and healthy environment between countries, as it should be, instead of threatening or resorting to the use of force. And we know what the results of such adventures has been and is likely to be in the future.

The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of RT.