Victory is within reach: Obama

The race for the Democrats’ presidential nomination appears to be slowly drawing to an end. Despite Hilary Clinton’s victory in Kentucky, rival Barack Obama has enough delegates and a realistic chance to become America's first black president.

For many, Obama represents the American Dream – a perfect rags-to-riches story.

Son of a Kenyan father and an American mother, he grew up in a poor family but made his way to attend one of the top universities in the U.S. – Columbia University in New York.

His stance on many issues, including the war in Iraq, marks a dramatic break from the Bush Administration's record.

Critics say Obama is too soft on terrorism. They have carped at his willingness to meet with the enemies of the United States, such as Iran and Cuba.

But much of the anti-Obama rhetoric has little to do with his stance on issues.

He's been called an elitist, not black enough and not Christian enough.

“I am a Christian and have never been a Muslim,” responded Obama, though that has done little to explode the myths about his religion.

Despite the Hollywood-type popularity and the good looks, Obama seems to be a family guy.

When not campaigning, he spends much of his time with his wife and two daughters.

Obama's ability to unite people of all races and religious beliefs, though, has raised some eyebrows.

Critics also worry about the more radical part of his following.

“At the age of 18, I got out voting and I am trying to build a new White House – paint it shit black,” said one of Obama’s supporters.